Sigh

letsdancetothestereotypes:

I don’t get this whole “hate justifies hate” thing. It’s never worked, it never will. Influential people in history such as Martin Luther King and Ghandi have all taken peaceful measures and argued their points logically and intelligently to get the point across. By doing the same thing your…

[x]

(Source: shebashimmy, via broadwaysexual)

kents-writing:

carrotsforferrets:

Some more reasons why I won’t join any sort of social justice movement.

Amen

(via broadwaysexual)

frozenmatilda:

Dave Thomas Brown posting photos that the fandom would sell their souls for

(Source: yogirlkeepittogether, via broadwaysexual)

theonion:

clickholeofficial:

Remember Tetris? One lucky fan got to experience it for real when an actual pile of bricks fell 120 feet from a nearby construction site and instantly killed him.

From our sister publication, ClickHole

Shafts of sunlight penetrate through upper windows of the Vaulted room of Grand Central Terminal, as crowds gather near the information kiosk on the Terminal concourse, c. 1935-1941. (via)

Shafts of sunlight penetrate through upper windows of the Vaulted room of Grand Central Terminal, as crowds gather near the information kiosk on the Terminal concourse, c. 1935-1941. (via)

(Source: vintagegal, via vintagegal)

(via pizza)

godlesssondheimite:

They finish the opening number of Into the Woods.

Cinderella walks on stage.

"I didn’t know that we were supposed to prepare that song," she says, putting a cup on the floor in front of her.

(via milkywhiteismybestfriend)

smithsonianlibraries:

July 31st is the birthday of artist and naturalist Mary Vaux Walcott. Born in 1860, Walcott took an early interest in the arts. After spending many of her summers in the wilds of Western Canada with her family, she turned her artistic inclinations towards botanical illustration. Later in life, she married Charles Doolittle Walcott, who was Secretary of the Smithsonian at the time (1914).

She returned to the Rockies for many months out of the year with Charles as he conducted paleontological and geological studies. There she continued her watercolor studies of native flowers. The Smithsonian published her illustrations in North American Wild Flowers in 1925 in a five volume set that you can find in the Biodiversity Heritage Library.  

We’ve posted about Walcott before, here and here. Her work is exceptionally beautiful, and we think some of the blooms here might have even been in bloom around her birthday.